Luke 9-10 (NLT) 

Discover His heart: He is Jehovah Jireh, the One who provides. 

@ Luke 9
“Late in the afternoon the twelve disciples came Him and said, ‘Send the crowds away to the nearby villages and farms, so they can find food and lodging for the night.  There is nothing to eat here in this remote place.’ But Jesus said, ‘You feed them.’” (12-13)

Can you imagine?  As a cook and one who has fed small multitudes of people on occasion, the logistical nightmare of feeding 5,000 men plus women and children brings me to my knees, literally. With 5 loaves of bread and 2 fish, the size of each being inconsequential at this point, and 10,000-15,000 hungry people, well, we can do the math.  What was He saying?  Did He realize what He was asking?  Of course, He did.

I’ve learned some little tricks through the years in feeding large groups of people.  Take for instance a food item requiring a serving spoon.  If more people show up than expected, I provide a small serving spoon; and if fewer show up, I use the largest spoon in my kitchen drawer.  For some reason, there always seems to be just enough food.  Imagine that!  But no matter how small I would have cut those fish sandwiches that day, there was not going to be enough food.  Even though the disciples protested at His response, the miracle began when they submitted to His request.

“Jesus took the five loaves and two fish, looked up toward heaven, and blessed them. Then, breaking the loaves into pieces, He kept giving the bread and fish to the disciples so they could distribute it…all ate as much as they wanted.”(16-17)  When we give out of our lack in obedience to His prompting, it signals God to perform the miraculous.

In today’s economy, many are facing lack, but it is in our lack and limitations when the miraculous takes place.  When we give out of our abundance, it’s a gift or offering, and this is good; but when we give out of our lack, it becomes a miracle!  We hold in our hands what little we have, asking Him to bless it and to use however He may choose, whether to meet our needs or the needs of others.  He takes our limited resources and multiplies them and their effectiveness more than we could ever imagine.  Miraculous!

This story of 5,000 unexpected dinner guests is the only miracle of Jesus recorded in all four of the gospels, obviously impacting Jews and Gentiles alike – a tax collector, a young adult, a doctor and a fisherman in the mix. It shows that God is concerned about our physical needs as well as our spiritual needs.

Perhaps the disciples were just learning about who they were following, this man called Jesus claiming to be the Son of God.  Perhaps they were just discovering that He was Jehovah, Jehovah Jireh, the One who provides.  Have we really discovered Who it is that we are following?  “And afterward, the disciples picked up twelve baskets of leftovers!” (17)  Jehovah Jireh, He provides more than enough!

Moving Forward: Today I hold in my hands my lack, asking Him to bless it and multiply it however He chooses.  I know that He will provide more than enough – He is Jehovah Jireh, my Provider. 

Tomorrow @ Ephesians 1-3

Genesis 20-23 (NLT)

Discover His heart: He is Jehovah Jireh, our Provider 

@ Genesis 22
“Take your son, your only son—yes, Isaac, whom you love so much—and go to the land of Moriah. Go and sacrifice him as a burnt offering on one of the mountains, which I will show you.” (2) I remember a sermon my husband preached many years ago on the story of Abraham and Isaac, and it’s distinctive in my memory because of the touching illustration he used. Tom started to tell the story of the sacrifice of Isaac and called our young son up front to stand with him.  As the story unfolded, he asked our son to lie on the altar, and with tears streaming down his face, he spoke of the incredible anguish that Abraham must have felt as he raised the knife in obedience to God.  Now if you know my husband, the crying is not so significant, but because I knew him so well, I could tell he was shaken by the thought of sacrificing someone he loved so much.

When I read this story, I can’t help but focus on the journey to Moriah.  Abraham had traveled across that entire region of the world to live in Canaan, but I would imagine that journey did not compare in intensity to the 50 miles to Moriah.  While Isaac was enjoying an outing with his dad, Abraham was facing the greatest testing of his life.  We know little about the conversation on the journey, but what we do know speaks volumes to us.

As Moriah came into view, “Stay here with the donkey,’ Abraham told the servants. ‘The boy and I will travel a little farther. We will worship there, and then we will come right back.’”  Then we will come right back, not I will come right back, but we.  Abraham’s statement wasn’t trickery or deceit, but somewhere during the journey, he resolved in his heart that they would both return.  The writer of Hebrews expressed it this way, “Abraham reasoned that if Isaac died, God was able to bring him back to life again.” (Hebrews 11:19)  We will come right back. No wonder Abraham is listed in the Faith Hall of Fame!

Then, as they continued up to Moriah, “As the two of them walked on together, Isaac turned to Abraham and said, ‘Father?’ ‘Yes, my son?’ Abraham replied. ‘We have the fire and the wood,’ the boy said, ‘but where is the sheep for the burnt offering?’” (6-7)

I’ve imagined Abraham pondering every promise from God as he took each step to Moriah > God would make him a great nation> his descendants would be like the dust of earth that couldn’t be counted > as many descendants as the stars in the sky > God would make him the father of nations.  With confidence, Abraham could reply to his son, “God will provide a sheep for the burnt offering, my son,’ Abraham answered.  And they both walked on together.” (8)  Isaac was the son of promise, and God would provide.

We may walk through situations that seem to be completely unlike what our loving God would allow His children to endure.  It is then, like Abraham, we are challenged to act on what we know the character of God to be, not on how the circumstances may dictate His character to be.  I’ve lived long enough to know that things are rarely as they seem.  Our resolve to walk in obedience and faith will be undergirded as we think over the promises of God and remember that He doesn’t lie and that He can only be faithful. Jehovah Jireh, our Provider – God will provide. 

Moving Forward:  “Abraham believed God, and God counted him as righteous because of his faith. He was even called the friend of God.” (James 2:23)  I want to be like Abraham. 

Tomorrow @ Judges 1-6

Luke 9-10 (NLT) 

Discover His heart: He is Jehovah Jireh, the One who provides. 

@ Luke 9
“Late in the afternoon the twelve disciples came Him and said, ‘Send the crowds away to the nearby villages and farms, so they can find food and lodging for the night.  There is nothing to eat here in this remote place.’ But Jesus said, ‘You feed them.’” (12-13)

Can you imagine?  As a cook and one who has fed small multitudes of people on occasion, the logistical nightmare of feeding 5,000 men plus women and children brings me to my knees, literally. With 5 loaves of bread and 2 fish, the size of each being inconsequential at this point, and 10,000-15,000 hungry people, well, we can do the math.  What was He saying?  Did He realize what He was asking?  Of course He did.

I’ve learned some little tricks through the years in feeding large groups of people.  Take for instance a food item requiring a serving spoon.  If more people show up than expected, I provide a small serving spoon; and if fewer show up, I use the largest spoon in my kitchen drawer.  For some reason, there always seems to be just enough food.  Imagine that!  But no matter how small I would have cut those fish sandwiches that day, there was not going to be enough food.  Even though the disciples protested at His response, the miracle began when they submitted to His request.

“Jesus took the five loaves and two fish, looked up toward heaven, and blessed them. Then, breaking the loaves into pieces, He kept giving the bread and fish to the disciples so they could distribute it…all ate as much as they wanted.”(16-17)  When we give out of our lack in obedience to His prompting, it signals God to perform the miraculous.

In today’s economy many are facing lack, but it is in our lack and limitations when the miraculous takes place.  When we give out of our abundance, it’s a gift or offering and this is good; but when we give out of our lack, it becomes a miracle!  We hold in our hands what little we have, asking Him to bless it and to use however He may choose, whether to meet our needs or the needs of others.  He takes our limited resources and multiplies them and their effectiveness more than we could ever imagine.  Miraculous!

This story of 5,000 unexpected dinner guests is the only miracle of Jesus recorded in all four of the gospels, obviously impacting Jews and Gentiles alike, a tax collector, a young adult, a doctor and a fisherman in the mix. It shows that God is concerned about our physical needs as well as our spiritual needs.

Perhaps the disciples were just learning about who they were following, this man called Jesus claiming to be the Son of God.  Perhaps they were just discovering that He was Jehovah, Jehovah Jireh, the One who provides.  Have we really discovered who it is that we are following?  “And afterward, the disciples picked up twelve baskets of leftovers!” (17)  Jehovah Jireh, He provides more than enough!

Moving Forward: Today I hold in my hands my lack, asking Him to bless it and multiply it however He chooses.  I know that He will provide more than enough – He is Jehovah Jireh, my Provider. 

Tomorrow @ Ephesians 1-3

Genesis 20-23 (NLT)

Discover His heart: He is Jehovah Jireh, our Provider 

@ Genesis 22
“Take your son, your only son—yes, Isaac, whom you love so much—and go to the land of Moriah. Go and sacrifice him as a burnt offering on one of the mountains, which I will show you.” (2) I remember a sermon my husband preached many years ago on the story of Abraham and Isaac, and it’s distinctive in my memory because of the touching illustration he used. Tom started to tell the story of the sacrifice of Isaac and called our young son up front to stand with him.  As the story unfolded, he asked our son to lie on the altar, and with tears streaming down his face, he spoke of the incredible anguish that Abraham must have felt as he raised the knife in obedience to God.  Now if you know my husband, the crying is not so significant, but because I knew him so well, I could tell he was shaken by the thought of sacrificing someone he loved so much.

When I read this story, I can’t help but focus on the journey to Moriah.  Abraham had traveled across that entire region of the world to live in Canaan, but I would imagine that journey did not compare in intensity to the 50 miles to Moriah.  While Isaac was enjoying an outing with his dad, Abraham was facing the greatest testing of his life.  We know little about the conversation on the journey, but what we do know speaks volumes to us.

As Moriah came into view, “Stay here with the donkey,’ Abraham told the servants. ‘The boy and I will travel a little farther. We will worship there, and then we will come right back.’”  Then we will come right back, not I will come right back, but we.  Abraham’s statement wasn’t trickery or deceit, but somewhere during the journey, he resolved in his heart that they would both return.  The writer of Hebrews expressed it this way, “Abraham reasoned that if Isaac died, God was able to bring him back to life again.” (Hebrews11:19)  We will come right back. No wonder Abraham is listed in the Faith Hall of Fame!

Then, as they continued up to Moriah, “As the two of them walked on together, Isaac turned to Abraham and said, ‘Father?’ ‘Yes, my son?’ Abraham replied. ‘We have the fire and the wood,’ the boy said, ‘but where is the sheep for the burnt offering?’” (6-7)

I’ve imagined Abraham pondering every promise from God as he took each step to Moriah > God would make him a great nations > his descendants would be like the dust of earth that couldn’t be counted > as many descendants as the stars in the sky > God would make him the father of nations.  With confidence, Abraham could reply to his son, “God will provide a sheep for the burnt offering, my son,’ Abraham answered.  And they both walked on together.” (8)  Isaac was the son of promise, and God would provide.

We may walk through situations that seem to be completely unlike what our loving God would allow His children to endure.  It is then, like Abraham, we are challenged to act on what we know the character of God to be, not on how the circumstances may dictate His character to be.  I’ve lived long enough to know that things are rarely as they seem.  Our resolve to walk in obedience and faith will be undergirded as we think over the promises of God and remember that He doesn’t lie and that He can only be faithful. Jehovah Jireh, our Provider – God will provide. 

Moving Forward:  “Abraham believed God, and God counted him as righteous because of his faith. He was even called the friend of God.” (James 2:23)  I want to be like Abraham. 

Tomorrow @ Judges 1-6