2 Corinthians 9-10 

Discover His heart:  He rewards and remembers our generous hearts

I’ve visited a few churches over the years where the congregations had a rather unique response at the announcement that it was offering time.  They would break out in applause and praises to the Lord.  No apologies were made for receiving the offering, and there was no hesitancy in giving.  All I can assume is that these congregations had learned the key to giving and looked forward to the opportunity to do so as found in Paul’s teaching in Chapter 9.  Blessed congregations! 

2 Corinthians 9
“Remember this—a farmer who plants only a few seeds will get a small crop. But the one who plants generously will get a generous crop.  You must each decide in your heart how much to give. And don’t give reluctantly or in response to pressure. For God loves a person who gives cheerfully.” (6-7)

If we’ve ever received a gift that was given to us with reluctance or displeasure, a great deal of the joy that the gift could have brought to us was never realized.  In fact, we can look at the gift in the future and still feel sadness about the reluctance that came with it. No wonder Paul reminds us to give cheerfully to others.  God loves us when we give with a joyful heart, and He makes sure that there will be more to give in the future.  We are cheerful, the receiver is cheerful and God loves us – it makes me cheerful just to think about it!  But that’s not all…

“Yes, you will be enriched in every way so that you can always be generous. And when we take your gifts to those who need them, they will thank God So two good things will result from this ministry of giving—the needs of the believers in Jerusalem will be met, and they will joyfully express their thanks to God… And they will pray for you with deep affection because of the overflowing grace God has given to you.” (11-12,14)

Our cheerful giving will not only be rewarded by God’s love for us, which in itself is more than enough, but we also will be enriched > enhanced > supplemented> deepened in every way!  And yet another bonus is that the recipients of our gifts will thank God and pray for us with deep affection.  I, for one, take all the prayers on my behalf I can get.

When we think about eternity in Heaven, we want our deeds to follow us there.  Paul offered a promise for those with generous hearts, one that will stand the test of time, “They share freely and give generously to the poor. Their good deeds will be remembered forever.” (9)  So, there are actually two things that we will take with us into eternity – those we have won to the Lord and the memory of good deeds.

So, when we are tempted to hoard or close our hand in financially challenging times, we would do well to remember those less fortunate than us because we are God’s instruments to touch their lives.  Give, not haphazardly or unwisely, but give with generosity and with smiles on our faces.  When we do this, according to Paul, we really have a lot to smile about. 

Moving Forward:  Over and over again I’m reminded that I can’t outgive God.  He always wins! But I will give to others with a cheerful, generous heart and prove that His Word is true. 

Tomorrow @ Exodus 25-28

Psalms 48-50 (NLT) 

Discover His heart: Knowing the brevity of our lives, He values our eternal gains

The old saying, “You can’t take it with you,” speaks of our entrance into eternity without all the items we’ve collected through the years and is a truth that most of us accept.  However, a few millenniums ago, the Egyptians were convinced that they could take it all into eternity as a comfort in the afterlife.

In 1922, Howard Carter discovered the tomb of King Tutankhamen who died around 1346 B.C. at the age of 18.  The tomb had remained untouched for over 3000 years and contained a treasury of gold and valuable items that boggles the mind.  It seems the Egyptians wanted King Tut to be comfortable in his new surroundings by allowing him to take with him all the things he cherished most.  Of course, after his death the young King knew something that the other Egyptians did not know at the time and that is you just can’t take it with you. 

@ Psalm 49
With all the economic problems we’ve had over the past few years, investors have lost a lot of money and many others have lost their jobs and their homes.  The drug lords, swindlers and scam artists seem to be doing all right, however, but according to Psalm 49:16-17, this is not something we should worry about. “So don’t be dismayed when the wicked grow rich and their homes become ever more splendid.  For when they die, they take nothing with them. Their wealth will not follow them into the grave.”

We spend a great deal of time struggling to achieve the measures that society has dictated as success – houses, cars, upscale clothes and shoes and food and…upscale everything!  Sadly, our indulgences finally caught up with us a few years ago.  The economic problems have caused many to return to basics, but nobody likes it very much and most people find it depressing.  I believe that God loves to bless us with upgrades at times, but it surely must sadden Him when we are depressed without them.

Timothy had a good idea of what really defines great wealth, “Yet true godliness with contentment is itself great wealth.  After all, we brought nothing with us when we came into the world, and we can’t take anything with us when we leave it.  So if we have enough food and clothing, let us be content.” (I Timothy 6:6-8)  What great counsel for us today!

Knowing we can’t take all our stuff with us, is it really worth all the time and energy we spend trying to achieve it? James had a way of putting things in the proper perspective, “Your life is like the morning fog – it’s here a little while, then it’s gone.” (James 4:14) That about sums it up.  Life is short – eternity is a very, very long time.  It has been said that through our witness, people are the only thing we take with us into eternity.  Wise investments with great returns! 

Moving Forward: I’ll enjoy every blessing that I receive today but remain ever mindful of those things with eternal value. 

Tomorrow @ Job 33-34

Psalms 12-14 (NLT) 

Discover His heart: He answers our prayers based on His eternal clock

It’s disheartening to me to be around someone who is upset about something, possibly with me, but not willing to express what it is – commonly known as the silent treatment.  Yes, those who easily express their feelings can be annoying at times, but at least we know what problem exists and we can offer a response. Communication is good, especially when it comes from a heart that does not want to hurt and is seeking a resolve.

I don’t imagine that God ever found it necessary to say to David, “Well, David, why don’t you tell me how you really feel.”  Psalms offers many of David’s laments to God that were expressions of sadness, sorrow or disappointment when he faced betrayal and hatred from his enemies.  What I like about David’s laments is that, just like a good movie, they always seem to end well. 

@ Psalm 13
“O Lord, how long will you forget me?  Forever?  How long will you look the other way? How long must I struggle with anguish in my soul, with sorrow in my heart every day? How long will my enemy have the upper hand?” (1-2)  How long? I think we have a theme going here, and I’ve certainly sung this song.  At times I am convinced that heaven’s clock needs a new battery.  David asks, “Forever?” and forever is the key to the answer.  God’s timing is not based on the World Clock, it’s based on eternity.

God answers our cry to Him based on the timeless click of His eternal clock because He is more interested in our eternal destination than our temporary lament.  I love Him for that.  Sometimes in the delay God is orchestrating our answer through others and at other times He is changing our own hearts.  Regardless of how long, He is answering according to our eternal good.

David snapped out of his despair and hope was renewed as he offered a prayer request to God.  Prayer is our indication to God that we have hope that He will respond to our need.  “Turn and answer me, O Lord my God!  Restore the sparkle to my eyes, or I will die.  Don’t let my enemies gloat, saying, ‘We have defeated him!’  Don’t let them rejoice at my downfall.”(3-4)  Restore the sparkle in my eyes – how could our loving God, the One who put the sparkle in our eyes, resist that request!  When we pray without the disguise of contrived words or pretense and speak from our hearts, we touch God’s heart.

David talked himself right into trusting the Lord through his trial, “But I trust in your unfailing love. I will rejoice because you have rescued me.  I will sing to the Lord because he is good to me.” (5-6)   With hope renewed, David remembered that he could trust God’s unfailing love.  In fact, God had been so faithful to David in the past that he could rejoice ahead of time for the victory in this trial. Trusting God does not always give immediate answers, but it does give us the encouragement we need.   And finally, David burst into song – a song of praise about the goodness of God.  A great ending!

God understands our laments, but He doesn’t want us to wallow in them.  We can express our feelings, but we should give Him a prayer request as well. In doing so, we are expressing our confidence in Him to meet our needs. Then, filled with hope and trust like David, we will sing songs of praise in sync with the timeless click of His clock.  Tick-tock! 

Moving Forward:  No lamenting for me today. With a heart filled with hope and trust, I’m singing songs of praise, keeping with the beat of His tick-tock. 

Tomorrow @ Job 9-10